Effective
Ethics Reporting/
Whistleblower Solutions
ClearView Connects™ is a Canadian-made confidential and anonymous telephone (hotline) and web-based ethics reporting/whistleblower solution that is used to monitor wrongdoing and increase financial transparency in organizations.
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Charting a course towards enhanced corporate governance and transparency requires meaningful and timely information. ClearView Strategic Partners Inc. has developed a suite of services to help you improve your organization’s corporate governance, employee engagement, communications, compliance and ethics programs.

ClearView Strategic Partners Inc. helps you navigate your way to improved internal financial control and meet the ‘whistleblower’ compliance requirements of Sarbanes-Oxley (301.4), National Instrument 52-110, and National Policy 58-201.

ClearView Connects™ is a web and telephone-based system that is accessible 24/7/365 allowing employees and 3rd parties to anonymously and confidentially report incidents of wrongdoing, as well as other issues, concerns, suggestions and ideas for process improvement.

ClearView’s Ethics Advisory Services provides organizations with an independent and expert view of their ethics programs and systems, allowing organizations to increase the effectiveness of their investment in ethics – their ‘Return on Ethics’.

For more information on ClearView Connects™, please contact Phil Enright at +1 416.481.9167, or toll-free at 1.866.337.8369.  For information on ClearView’s Ethics Advisory Services, please contact Michelle Vincent at +1 416.481.5329 or toll-free at 1.866.245.2096.

If you are a first time visitor to our website and you want to make a report about an organization simply enter the organization’s name in the box provided on this page and follow the step-by-step instructions.

12/16/2014

Culture Drives Reputation

Culture describes how a company really does business, and reputation is how external stakeholders perceive it. Over long time horizons, these internal and external views converge (and often overshoot). There is a cost associated with having a worse reputation than is justified, from higher lending costs to fewer quality applicants, so companies often invest to improve their reputation with the general public.


12/07/2014

Ethical businesses honour the whistleblowers

Lots of people at General Motors knew about the faulty ignition switch. But nothing happened to change the situation. Enron had a concerned whistleblower, but she couldn’t change the course of the company before it was too late. For many people, that’s proof companies are too fixated on profit so ethics – at best – takes second place or that corporate suites are filled with unethical people. But Mark Pastin, who has spent 35 years as an ethical consultant to companies and is president of the Council of Ethical Organizations, a non-profit that promotes ethical conduct by businesses, doesn’t buy that argument. He believes most corporate leaders are ethical, but can be tripped up by organizational rigidities and simple, if dangerous, mistakes.


11/19/2014

Rats in the ranks: Collusion and white-collar crime

The common perception of the modern fraudster is the lone wolf – such as Ponzi scheme architect Bernie Madoff, or "rogue" Barings trader, Nick Leeson. And yet, virtually all the recent major frauds, ranging from Enron to WorldCom in the US and Parmalat and Satyam elsewhere, have involved extensive collaboration between co-offenders. Clinton Free, a professor in the school of accounting at UNSW Business School, has researched how fraud offenders work in concert with others in a recent paper, The ties that bind: The decision to co-offend in fraud,​ co-authored with Pamela Murphy from Queen's University School of Business.



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